Art Basel Hong Kong

Booth 3C06

March 27 – 31, 2018

Etel Adnan

Untitled, 2017

Oil on canvas

16.1 x 13 inches (41 x 33 cm)

Günther Förg

Untitled, 1996

Acrylic on canvas

86.6 x 76.8 inches (220 x 195 cm)

Samuel Levi Jones

Essence, 2018

Deconstructed medical books on canvas

55 x 60 inches (139.7 x 152.4 cm)

Rosemary Laing

The Flowering of the Strange Orchid, 2017

Archival pigment print

39 x 79 inches (100 x 200 cm)

Edition of 8

Lin Tianmiao

F + You No. 2, 2017

Black velvet, woolen yarn, silk thread, cotton thread

39.5 x 39.5 inches (100 x 100 cm)

(GL11085)

Nalini Malani

Part Object, 2007 - 2008

12 parts, acrylic, ink and enamel paint on acrylic sheet 

92.9 x 124 inches (236 x 315 cm) overall

Joan Miró

Figure, 1981

Bronze

Edition of 6

49.6 x 19.7 x 11 inches (126 x 50 x 28 cm)

Hélio Oiticica

Metaesquema 059, 1957

Gouache on cardboard

17.9 x 21.25 inches (45.2 x 53.7 cm)

Yoko Ono

MIRROR IMAGE (for Hong Kong), 2018

Chairs, mirror, table, gold thumbtacks, pencils, paper, framed instructions

Dimensions variable

Yoko Ono

Franklin Summer, 1998

Ink on paper

6.9 x 4.6 inches (17.5 x 11.6 cm)

Sean Scully

3.26.95, 1995

Pastel on paper

28.75 x 40.9 inches (73 x 104 cm)

Nancy Spero

P.E.A.C.E., Helicopter, Mother + Children, 1968

Gouache and ink on paper

24 x 19 inches (61 x 48 cm)

Barthélémy Toguo

Keep Talking, 2017

Acrylic and ink on paper mounted on canvas

78.7 x 78.7 inches (200 x 200 cm)

Fabienne Verdier

Vide Vibration, 2017

Acrylic and mixed media on canvas

72 x 160.2 inches (183 x 407 cm)

Press Release

Galerie Lelong & Co. is pleased to announce its presentation for Art Basel Hong Kong 2018 with a selection of work by Etel Adnan, Pierre Alechinsky, Günther Förg, Samuel Levi Jones, Rosemary Laing, Lin Tianmiao, Hélio Oiticica, Yoko Ono, Nalini Malani, Joan Miró, Jaume Plensa, Sean Scully, Nancy Spero, Antoni Tàpies, Walasse Ting, Barthélémy Toguo, and Fabienne Verdier.

Yoko Ono will present a new instruction piece: MIRROR IMAGE (for Hong Kong) for the Kabinett Sector. Framed instructions read: “Look into the mirror and see yourself. Write down what you see.” The sparseness of the room and of the instruction prompts reflection and provides a rare space of contemplation within the visual cacophony of the art fair.

Other highlights of the booth include a new large-scale resin sculpture by internationally recognized artist Jaume Plensa. His portraits of quiet contemplation unify individuals through universal connections of spirituality, the body, and collective memory. Nalini Malani, whose retrospective at the Centre Pompidou in 2017 will have a sequel at the Castello di Rivoli in Italy this spring, presents a large scale multi-part work, Part Object II, which was previously in the major exhibition Indian Highway at the Serpentine Gallery in London. Historical sculpture and works on paper by Joan Miró will also be on view. 

Paintings by Walasse Ting and Pierre Alechinsky tell a special story; the two met in Paris in the mid 1950’s, when Ting taught Alechinsky how to work with Chinese brushes and rice paper, eventually leading to a collaborative partnership on some paintings for Art Basel Hong Kong. Alechinsky personally elected to show his black-and-white La hutte lapone (1976) next to Ting’s colorful work to indicate their friendship and mutual influence.

Other paintings on view include Etel Adnan’s landscapes, which demonstrate her ongoing explorations of memory and exile. Günther Förg also reflected on both individual experience and historical memory with painterly abstraction. Sean Scully’s pastels on paper are as rich as paintings, employing a deceptively reductive vocabulary of colored bands to convey both harmony and fracture. Intricate textile paintings by Lin Tianmiao, who was included in the recent landmark exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, investigates social norms of gendered identity reinforced by language. The gallery is pleased to introduce for the first time in Hong Kong, paintings by Samuel Levi Jones created from deconstructed medical books that unravel the institutionalized knowledge they held.

Rosemary Laing’s Buddens series was recently shown in a solo exhibition at the Tarrawarra Museum of Art in Australia. The artist describes the series as, “a narrative for the movement of people, the condition of landforms with a changing peopled condition.”

Works on paper include Nancy Spero’s The War Series (1966-70), which confront the cruelty of the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War by anthropomorphizing instruments of war as monstrous figures. Barthélémy Toguo’s Keep Talking (2017) addresses the paradox between today’s obsession with communication and the inability to listen.

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